Myprogress Observations

Occasional notes from the Myprogress team on observational assessment, evidencing competencies, mobile devices and other interesting corners of teaching and learning in hospitals, schools and other work environments.

This is the second in a series of top tips for educators looking to assess students in challenging environments. We look at issues around professionalism when using devices in clinical areas.

Skills that have traditionally been signed off on paper, and feedback from professionals that has traditionally been gathered using forms can now be recorded electronically. But what impact does this have on the doctor or health professional's professional image?

This is the third in a series of top tips for educators looking to assess students in challenging environments. We look at issues around observational assessments when the assessors in practice are clinicians or preceptors who work for the hospital, not for your institution, and you don't know in advance who they might be.

Using observational assessments in practice settings is an important aspect of developing and managing the acquisition of new skills, especially in medicine and healthcare and related professions.

This is the first in a series of top tips for educators looking to assess students in challenging environments. We explore the pitfalls and challenges of the so-called "BYOD" (bring your own device) model.

It sounds like a great idea – use smartphones and tablets for work based assessment of clinical skills. But how do you manage the diverse array of mobile devices available particularly if you want to support BYOD (bring your own device) both to keep costs down and also to support personal choice of device?